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Thursday, 26 August 2010

Hoya pubicalyx

Hoya is a climbing plant but I leave mine to trail over the flower pot. When it becomes warm outside, I hang the pot on the terrace. Some keep it in the pot trained on the trelly and do not move it again. If the conditions on the spot are favourable, eventually it becomes pretty big. Hoya is native to southern Asia, Polynesia and Australia and belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae. There are about 300 hundreds of Hoya species. I think I have Hoya pubicalyx because the flower petals are covered in fine hairs.

It has got an interesting common name - Waxflower or Waxplant reffering to the look of the flowers that are sturdy and look as if they were made of wax. Hoya is popular house plant in temperate zones.


The flowers appear in clusters at the top of the peduncles. The flower umbels appear always on the same peduncle which grows longer every season. The leaves are rigid and green having small silvery spots. Flowers are scented and exude a sweet nectar appearing as small drops on it. Each flower has five thick, waxy petals, pale rose in colour. Leave them to drop off naturally when they are dead. Removing them by hand may damage delicate flower stems.


Hoya is easy to grow requiring reasonable amount of light but better away form direct sun. In a shade the leaves would be dark green having more chloroplasts for the photosynthesis. They are hardy by -1°C. The soil has to be well drained but moisture retentive. Reduce the watering in winter once per month to induce plant dormancy. 

 

Hoya can be propagated by stem cuttings in summer. Simply put the cutting into mixture of peat and perlite, water and cover with a plastic bag (I use plastic bottles) and leave it in warm place away from the direct sun light. Replant when it takes the roots.

Nectar drops on the flowers.

4 comments:

  1. Hello Kalipso, this is my first time here, thanks for linking with Plantchaser. I see you are from Croatia, and i am amazed at the wide temperature range Hoya can thrive. Many hoya are endemic to our country and my friend is a breeder with already a species to her name. I love these plants as the flowers really look so special. By the way, the head of the UPOV in Croatia is my friend, Ruzica. I hope you know her.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello:

    The first photo I think shows a hoya carnosa and has received an abrupt change of little or no direct sunlight to prolonged exposure direct sunlight. In my blog I explain and give some advice.

    You can see several hoyas pubicalyx on my blog.
    Sorry, my English isn´t very good.

    Regards.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello:

    The first photo I think shows a hoya carnosa and has received an abrupt change of little or no direct sunlight to prolonged exposure direct sunlight. In my blog I explain and give some advice.

    You can see several hoyas pubicalyx on my blog.
    Sorry, my English isn´t very good.

    Regards.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please, Use USA FLAG google translator. Thanks.
      http://hoyaspepeuve.blogspot.com.es/2013/05/hoya-carnosa-con-muchas-hojas-amarillas.html

      Delete

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