Pages

Wednesday, 15 June 2011

Flowers To Eat

Tropaeolum majus 'Tip Top Apricot'

 Nasturtium flowers as well as leaves are edible - not a secret at all. I love them because they remind me on granny's  cottage garden where they were trailing and climbing old weathered wooden fences. 
What is commonly known as nasturtium is actually the genus Tropaeolum. When the plants came to Europe from South or Central America, I have no idea. Anyway, thanks to one who has brought it here!

on the terrace

Being a very popular plant, there are many cultivars of them present on the market. The trailing species are good for window and terrace boxes, and the climbing ones for trellis and fences. I also plant them in the vegetable garden circling the vegetable beds with bushy one species. Snails don't love them and, except of being decorative, they have this protective function as well.

Tropaeolum majus 'Strawberries & Cream'

Tropaeolum seeds are usually sown outdoors where are to flower. I have sown mine in pots in March to get the plants early and then transplanted them in the garden and containers. I keep collecting the seeds but often some seeds overwinter outside and germinate in Spring. 
All parts of the plant is edible. Some make pickles of flower buds, looks somewhat like capers. Leaves and flowers may be put into salads or you can make this nasturtium butter.


You will need:
250 g butter, some salt, 10 - 15 nasturtium flowers and 5 nasturtium leaves. Chop flowers and leaves to tiny pieces. Mix into butter and add salt to taste. Roll it into sausage, Wrap it into cling foil and leave in the refrigerator or deep freezer for some time. The flavour is really mild and it also looks attractive. Use it to top cooked vegetables or bread spread for breakfast or cold plates. If you have time, you can fill the cookie moulds with it to form butter cake.


4 comments:

  1. Tvoj vrt je baš kao jedan mali arboretum, divan je!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've just sown some nasturtium seeds - a friend of mine also pickles the seed pods.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Stvarno ti je vrt čaroban,a ovaj receptić ću svakako probati čim mi dragoljupci dospiju,jer još su jako,jako mali...predivan post,tebi veliki pozdrav!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love the idea of using Nasturtiums - indeed any plant - for both decorative and culinary purposes. Another good thing about Nasturtiums is that they actually LIKE poor soil. If you put them in good soil you often get more leaf than desirable, and fewer flowers.

    ReplyDelete

I love your comments and appreciate your visit. Thank you!